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A Chat with Carly Chamberlain, Director of 10 CREATIVE WAYS TO DISPOSE OF YOUR CREMAINS at the 2017 Fringe

Interview by Bailey Green

We spoke with Carly Chamberlain, artistic producer of Neoteny Theatre and director of upcoming Fringe show 10 Creative Ways to Dispose of your Cremains written by Rose Napoli. Jakob Ehman and Rose Napoli star in this two hander about millennials, emotional baggage and bed bugs.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

BG: Tell me about working with Rose Napoli. How did you two meet?

CC: We both went to University of Windsor in the acting program, we were one class apart and she was like an honorary member of our class. So I’ve known her for 15 years, and we were friendly but never close. When we started working together at Canadian Stage, we reconnected and really hit it off. I went away to school and during that time she had been writing and we stayed connected. When she approached me this Fall about 10 Creative Ways, it felt like the right project. We’ve known each other for a long time, so to take our relationship a new level, so to speak, has been really exciting.

BG: What drew you into the script?

CC: It’s really different from what I had worked on recently. On the surface it seems quite contemporary, colloquial and casual. The first scene is at a party, it’s about millennials, and on the surface it seems like snappy little play. But there’s a lot of anxiety and deeper issues going on under the surface. It’s a play about people who are so desperate to connect, but their baggage gets in the way and I felt like that was a familiar experience and familiar to people I know. When I read it, I felt I knew these characters. Instant connection.

BG: So where do we find these characters at the start of the play?

CC: Two people meet at a party, and they end up not really getting along, but they stumble back upon each other while they are dealing with shit in their own lives. The play takes place over 24 hours, and then an epilogue. So [we see] two seemingly mis-matched people that may have the potential for a real connection, whether that is friendship or romance. It’s not really a love story in a traditional way. It’s a Toronto story. It’s about two people trying to maybe grow up and how to do that amongst the shit of bed bugs and trying to pay rent and trying to find some meaning in what they’re doing in their lives.

R-L: Rose Napoli, Jakob Ehman

BG: So Rose also acts in 10 Creative Ways, how have you both navigated that change in roles from playwright to actor? Or is it a more fluid process?

CC: It’s a new experience and I have never directed someone in their own work. So I went in with an open mind and to see what the needs would be. The play had some workshops so we both felt confident that the script was in a good place; there were things we’d change but there wouldn’t be massive re-writes in rehearsal. It’s a fluid relationship when I’m in rehearsal with Jakob and Rose. It’s important to me when working on new work not to look to the writer in the room to answer all of our questions, you still need to investigate just the way you would with Shakespeare or Chekhov. I like plays that leave those rough edges, and now that we’re deeper in, we just jump back and forth pretty fluidly. Jakob and Rose have worked together so they have that dynamic as well and it’s a pretty open room as far as the dialogue around changing the text when it’s needed.

BG: What has been the greatest joy working on this piece?

CC: I like when I’m working with really good people and am surprised by what they come up with. They have free rein in that way. I’m working with a design team who I’ve worked with before and are people I really trust. It has been a special experience, the contributions of the whole team and a lot of my work has been in response to what everyone else is giving, I am shaping the awesome ideas of all the people in the room. Anna [Treusch] who designed the set, came to me and said ‘I can see exactly what this set is,’ and that’s not the way she usually works, usually it’s a longer, organic process. So that was so unexpected to me. And Daniel [Bennett] for sound composition, he had a really clear idea right away. So I love getting to be surprised and inspired.

BG: It seems like we’re grappling with this ‘millennial question’ in art and theatre right now, and it can be really nebulous. Could you distill 10 Creative Ways into a couple short phrases?

CC: It’s about learning how to communicate when you’re more comfortable using emojis and it’s about making a choice to let go and accept that your baggage is in the room

BG: And lastly, what are you excited to see at fringe?

CC: The Diddlin Bibbles, they are so funny and shocking and strange and I always really love so I am looking forward to seeing a full set. I’m looking forward to Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons cause I love The Howland Company stuff but also, similarly to our piece, it has a title everyone remembers but yet still doesn’t quite know what it’s about, so I like that there’s a bit of mystery around it. And Nourishment, it’s got a couple of young creators that are doing some really interesting work, strong young women, and I’m excited about it.

10 Creative Ways to Dispose of Your Cremains

Photo Credit: Kyle Purcell

Who:
Written by Rose Napoli
Directed by Carly Chamberlain
Starring: Jakob Ehman & Rose Napoli
Producer: Nicole Myers-MitchellSet & Costume Design by Anna Treusch
Sound & Lighting Design by Daniel Bennett
Stage Management by Lucy McPhee
Production Management by David Costello
Photography & Graphic Design by Kyle Purcell

What:
Boy meets girl. Boy has broken vaporizer. Girl has bed bugs. “Ten Creative Ways to Dispose of your Cremains” is not just the longest title ever, it’s a millennial love letter to the misfits of the Peter Pan Generation.

From the writer of “Oregano”at the Storefront Theatre and the director of “Plucked” at Summerworks, comes a new old story about living on the outside. Starring Jakob Ehman and Rose Napoli.

Where:
Theatre Passe Muraille Backspace
16 Ryerson Ave.

When:
6th July – 9:30pm
8th July – 3:15pm
9th July – 8:00pm
10th July – 5:45pm
11th July – 10:15pm
13th July – 1:00pm
14th July – 8:45pm
16th July – 2:15pm

Tickets:
fringetoronto.com

Connect: 
Carly Chamberlain: @CarlyCha
Rose Napoli: @RoseNapoli1
Theatre Rhea: @TheatreRhea
Neoteny Theatre: /NeotenyTheatre
neotenytheatre.com

#CremainsTO

PLUCKED: Fear, Chickens and Bluegrass! In Conversation with director Carly Chamberlain

Interview by Shaina Silver-Baird

Shaina Silver-Baird: Based on the description on the SummerWorks webpage, I’m very intrigued, but know very little about what happens in the play itself. Tell me a bit, from your perspective, about the show.

Carly Chamberlain: The description is intentionally ambiguous because it’s actually an impossible play to describe without diminishing it in some way. Basically, it’s an absurd fable centered around a family farm. On this farm, for generations, the women have been turned into chickens by their fear. And in this world, eggs are extremely profitable – think thousands of millions of dollars. The men on the farm are trying to harvest these eggs in order to become millionaires.

The play all takes place on a single day during a period when there have been no chickens on the farm for twenty years. There are two women in the family: a mother and a daughter. The men (a father and a grandfather who has turned into a rooster), have been waiting for over 20 years for Abigail (the mother) to turn into a chicken.

The play starts on the morning that Abigail finally turns into a chicken, and that transformation sets a series of events in motion. For example, the daughter has promised herself that when her mom eventually turns into a chicken, she’s going to run away so that she doesn’t also turn into a chicken. Each scene is loosely an hour of the day as it progresses.

In a nutshell: Plucked is about fear turning women into chickens, and the men of the family making money off of that. It’s big and political, grappling with misogyny and patriarchy, but it’s also quite personal. We watch the cycles of generations in this family, repeating the same mistakes. It begs the question: is it even possible not to become our parents? The fear of that makes us lash out and try to control things we can’t actually control. 

Shaina: What role does the bluegrass music play in the show?

Carly: I wouldn’t classify this show as a musical, because I imagine musicals to be beautifully sung expressions of emotion. And that’s not what this is.

The rooster (otherwise known as the grandfather) is a character in the scenes but also a kind of MC/storyteller. There are often songs underscoring, or interrupting scenes. So the music plays a pretty chaotic role in the storytelling. The rhythm is quite fast, as all the characters are on stage the whole time, often popping out of character to play some kind of instrument. 

Shaina: Is it all original music?

Carly: No, all the songs are bluegrass standards that are quite old. The oldest one is called “Black Eyed Susie” and it’s impossible to know who originated it. These are standards that all the bluegrass greats have played. They’re really infectious.

I haven’t been sleeping very well, because I’ve had choruses playing on loop in my head as I lay in bed. They’re total earworms. 

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Shaina: I understand that you and Rachel have collaborated before?

Carly: We met at the National Theatre School while I was studying as a director and she was studying as a playwright. We were paired together to create a 15 min play – I was directing and dramaturging her piece. That play was so challenging and so exciting. It was also far from realism. For example, the opening stage direction were:

“A giant fist makes its way through a groaning door in agony.”
~ Rachel Ganz

That was the set up! I’m a pretty cerebral person and I like planning and structure. And Rachel works from a really visceral, gutsy, imaginative place. She takes a lot of risks. So I think that’s actually why we work so well together. I find I’m able to bring some structure to her images. She’s a generous writer because she doesn’t tell you exactly how you should stage her work. For example, one of the stage directions in Plucked is:

“Abigail explodes into eggs.”
~ Rachel Ganz (Plucked)

And that means whatever you want it to mean. I’m really excited by her work because it doesn’t feel safe. I never know how it’s going to go. Which is terrifying, but I feel like I have to be scared to do my best work. I can’t go in with a complete plan. It’s interesting working on this play for me, because I feel like so much of my journey developing as a director has been trying to change my relationship to fear. It’s a valuable thing, because when you’re afraid, you know you have something at risk.

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Shaina: Did you start as a director?

Carly: No, I started as an actor. But I was getting to play really good roles and not feeling satisfied. I finally produced and directed a double bill of two short plays at a tiny venue. From my point of view, it was a bit of a mess because I was directing purely based on a mix of impulse and what I had liked about working with other directors, without really having a process. But it was the one time in my life when I felt like “this is what I’m supposed to be doing.” I knew there were still skills I needed to develop, so I applied to NTS and ended up getting in. Now, I’m back! 

Shaina: So this is your welcome back to Toronto project?!

Carly: Yes! No pressure! With directing I find I can’t compartmentalize the way I could with acting because I had my one part. With directing I feel like I’m vulnerable all the time, because even when I’m not in rehearsal, I’m constantly processing it. It’s kind of inevitable that it becomes my everything.

Shaina: What can people expect from Plucked?

Carly: Ultimately, Plucked is not going to be for everyone. It’s dark, it’s really irreverent and the characters are not nice people. There are parts of it that will intentionally make people uncomfortable. My expectation is that it’s not going to be everyone’s cup of tea. But that’s actually exciting to me because I go to so many plays which everyone (seemingly) loves and I don’t. It’s a really alienating experience to go to a “hit” and everyone’s jumping to their feet, and I’m like… “what?!” And I feel like a lot of us secretly experience that.

I’m just not interested in doing realism in theatre. If I want to see good realism I can watch a movie. In theatre, there are so many more exciting, fun and challenging things we can do, than try to replicate real life. My hope is that this play will appeal to the people who are like me – who go see the really conventional work and are not satisfied.

Shaina: Describe “Plucked” in five words.  

Carly:                          Dark

                                                       Chaotic

         Playful                                                                Uncomfortable

                                    (ever-so-slightly) Hopeful

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Who:
Company: Newborn Theatre
Written by Rachel Ganz; Directed by Carly Chamberlain; Set and Costume Design by Anna Treusch; Stage Managed and Sound Design by Daniel Bennett; Produced by Laura Paduch; Dramaturged by Jonathan Garfinkel; Lighting Design by: Frank Donato; Fight Direction by Nate Bitton; Performed by Faisal Butt, Sochi Fried, Qianna MacGilchrist, Tim Machin, Tyrone Savage, Tim Walker.

What:
Infusing comedy, bluegrass music, and a complete lack of sentimentality, Plucked is set in a world where fear turns women into chickens, eggs are high currency, and vaginas are near-dangerous possessions. Plucked skewers patriarchy without holding punches. It exposes hard truths about fear and family. It’s funny because it’s fake; it’s vulnerable, but it’s okay because it ends with a curtain call, but it’s not okay because it’s familiar. Plucked is, after all, a true story. It’s just full of lies.

With Plucked, playwright Rachel Ganz and director Carly Chamberlain make their return to Toronto after collaborating together in Montreal at the National Theatre School of Canada. Ganz’s writing rejects the convention of the “well-made play”. Through her writing, comedy, music, and magic collide to expose humour, discomfort, and a sliver of hope.

“Rachel Ganz is an appalling, compelling, intelligent and hilarious new voice in theatre. Her play, “Vacuum”, directed for maximum distress and delight by Carly Chamberlain, was an articulate howl.” -Ann-Marie MacDonald

Curator’s Note
“Crafted chaos is one of my favorite things. It’s the feeling of a deep laugh caught in the belly because you don’t want to miss the next moment, which promises to hold as much delight as the previous. All this, plus unapologetically subversive politically-inspired outbursts!” – Tara Beagan

Where:
The Theatre Centre Mainspace
1115 Queen Street West
Toronto

When:
Friday August 5th 5:15 PM – 6:45 PM
Saturday August 6th 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Sunday August 7th 9:15 PM – 10:45 PM
Tuesday August 9th 7:45 PM – 9:15 PM
Wednesday August 10th 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Friday August 12th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Sunday August 14th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

More Show Info:
summerworks.ca/plucked/

Tickets:
summerworks.ca

Connect:
twitter – @NewbornTheatre
facebook – NewbornTheatre
instagram – @NewbornTheatre
hashtag – #PluckedTO

 

 

In Conversation with Carly Chamberlain & Susan Bond of Hart House Theatre’s “Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet)”

Interview by Ryan Quinn

RQ: Hello! So I’m here with Carly Chamberlain, director, and Susan Bond, dramaturge, of Hart House Theatre’s production of Ann-Marie MacDonald’s Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet). Tell me a bit about the show? 

CC: Essentially, it centres around a women who is an overlooked, often taken-advatage-of academic who is working on her thesis and she has a theory about some of Shakespeare’s plays that nobody believes in. That’s sort of the setup.

SB: So she’s come to a crisis about her work and her treatment in this academic model that she’s working through.

CC: In a larger sense, it’s her crisis of identity in general. So that’s the crisis, then she falls in a garbage can… as you do. There’s a magical element to the play where a choral moment initiates her falling into a garbage can, and falling into her subconscious, which takes form as a Shakespearean-like world.

SB: Right, she falls into a very specific Shakespearean world, as you could guess from the title. She falls into the worlds of Othello and Romeo and Juliet.

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Photo Credit: Scott Gorman. (LtoR) – Nathan Bitton as Romeo, Lesley Robertson as Constance, Katie Ribout as Juliet

CC: She meets two of her heroines, and it’s a journey set around finding her way out and solving her thesis question, but it’s really about meeting the so-called “real” versions of them and also finding her own identity. It’s really a journey of self-discovery, especially since it’s her subconscious, they’re all elements of her.

SB: At the same time, she’s helping solve their problems of mortality.

CC: She’s searching for her real identity by assisting them.

SB: I think it’s also worth mentioning for people who aren’t already familiar with the play and perhaps not familiar with the fact that Ann-Marie MacDonald is Canadian, and that she is a struggling academic at Queen’s University in Kingston.

CC: That being said, I think it’s important to note that while the play is very clever, and it references a lot of Shakespeare, I don’t think you have to be intimately familiar with the plays to enjoy it. It’s a human story of loving yourself.

SB: You’ll certainly get more out of it if you’re familiar with those two plays and the rest of Shakespeare’s work. You’ll see more of the layers in it if you do, but it’s not essential.

RQ: There’s a few things I want to touch on there. Constance is very much a modern protagonist. She’s an iconic character of Canadian theatre. Is there a calling for more strong, modern female protagonists?

CC: Yes! But I don’t think “strong” is the right word to describe her, necessarily. She has strength and she discovers her strength, but I think what makes her a good example of a female character in Canadian theatre is that she’s complex.

SB: Most of her problems aren’t “woman problems”. She has career problems and self-discovery problems, which are things that everyone has. She’s an important female character in that she’s a great role for female actors because she’s also more complex.

CC: The whole thing is about her finding her strength, but there’s a problem with the writing of female characters in general where if they aren’t someone’s girlfriend or wife or talking about their romances, the other extreme is that they’re superheroes; which is another sexualized, objectified version of a woman, as well.

RQ: So it looks at the concept of strength beyond the male-centric idea of what a strong woman looks like.

CC: Yeah. I think there’s something to it even beyond a male-centric idea. I mean, patriarchy is everywhere, so we’re all viewing through those goggles, but what’s really special to me about this play (and part of it is that you view whatever you’re working on through whatever you’re processing yourself) is that it’s not about male or female but about saying, “Hey, things are complicated, nothing’s black and white, and the mess of life is okay, and I’m still awesome even if I’m a mess”. That’s something we all need to readjust to as far as what strength is.

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Photo Credit: Scott Gorman. (LtoR) – Cydney Penner as Desdemona , Nathan Bitton as Iago, Lesley Robertson as Constance

SB: “You shouldn’t need to be above the mess. Strength is living in the mess and working through it.”

CC: But yes, to come back to the question, I do think there’s a real lack of complex female roles in film and TV, obviously in classical theatre, but also in Canadian theatre. We spoke about finding other Canadian plays with complex women in them and it’s actually a struggle.

RQ: In pop culture in general. In the zeitgeist, there are very few of them.

CC: Yeah, and then, when there is, it’s a big thing. Look at the reaction to HBO’s Girls.

RQ: Because there’s that thing where people look at it and say “But these characters are kind of shitty sometimes. How are they supposed to be female role models?”

CC: I read a really interesting article recently that compared Hannah from Girls to Llewyn Davis from Inside Llewyn Davis, and it was showing that that’s a perfect example of the flaws in innate sexism. We look at Llewyn Davis and we’re like, “Man, he’s fucked up. He’s talented, but he’s fucked up and he makes fucked up decisions. He’s a tragic hero,” but with Hannah we’re like “You’re a brat. Get over yourself”. I would argue that the Coen Brothers do romanticize Llewyn Davis more than Lena Dunham romanticizes her character, but it’s the same thing, she’s a self-indulgent, talented person and so is he, but she is the one who gets ragged on.

SB: Also, I think that because there’s a relative dearth of complex female characters like that, she winds up standing in for not just self-indulgent talented people but also “ladies”, or “girls” in general. That’s just a problem of underrepresentation.

CC: Since there’s a lack in general, every female character has to live up to the standard of not being any stereotype, which is pretty impossible.

RQ: As soon as someone becomes iconic in that sense, they have to be everything to everyone all the time.

CC: Exactly, which is impossible. But, as much as I’m all about more roles for women, I don’t think anyone that champions that wants to watch plays about perfect people, because why would you watch it?

RQ: So what you’re talking about is that female characters are allowed to have conflict. They don’t have to be the side character but they also don’t have to be above all conflict and completely inscrutable.

CC: Essentially.

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Photo Credit: Scott Gorman. (LtoR) – Katie Ribout as Juliet, Lesley Robertson as Constance, Cydney Penner as Desdemona

RQ: So, Susan, as a dramaturge, there are several different worlds in this play. How do you go about investigating the different worlds and how they interconnect?

SB: My speciality as a dramaturge is working with Shakespeare, so the knowledge I bring to the table at a production is going to be actually stronger than the Canadian academic world, despite being a Canadian graduate student, though not in the 80’s. You referred to Constance as a “modern” female character, but she’s not actually that modern, she’s set in the 1980’s and it’s surprising how much that world lives in the play. Because we’re not actually in Verona or Cyprus, we’re in Constance’s imagination, it’s amazing how her world kind of emerges in them in strange ways.

CC: And we’re definitely trying to highlight that. I think sometimes people go for an interpretation where we’re actually there in stereotype-land. Our set doesn’t change, other than through light and sound, and that’s on purpose. The office is onstage the whole time. Something we talked about from the very beginning is the idea that she’s in “Cyprus”, not Cyprus. Because of that, the dramaturgy becomes complex. The first step is saying “this is what it was in the original play”, and making a conscious choice if it’s going to be different.

SB: “This is what the coastline in Cyprus was. These are the places it would be appropriate for Desdemona to be. This is where a historical Desdemona would be. This is where Shakespeare’s Desdemona would be.” But, MacDonald’s Desdemona is in a different place altogether.

CC: The layers of references in the play are astounding. For example, there are a lot of references to alchemy; but there’s a difference between Renaissance alchemy, which is transmuting base metals to gold; but there’s a very intentional layer on top which is Jung’s idea that they were being metaphorical and alchemy is actually about self-actualization. So, all that stuff is layered in.

SB: There’s a lot of dramaturgy in this show.

RQ: And all the layers inform each other, right?

CC: Yup, real easy, super easy.

SB: Yeah, I just know what the words mean.

CC: But that’s something about Shakespearean dramaturgy in general, is that the actors or I might have a question about what some little thing means and we might find out it’s a reference to some obscure thing.

SB: Like the Gustav manuscript. It’s an 18th Century German novel about someone searching for a manuscript that was lost, so in a way, it sets up the premise for Constance’s entire academic career.

CC: Yeah, then you go, “This is all interesting, but to the character, it means nothing”. You don’t know these things, it’s outside of the world.

SB: But then some elements are conscious references, so it all ties into itself.

RQ: And how has it been working with Hart House on this show?

CC: It’s good. We both have histories with them, though Susan’s is longer.

SB: I’m the Resident Dramaturge.

RQ: How did you start there?

SB: I started as a dramaturge for Canopy Theatre, which is associated with Hart House and so I worked with Jeremy [Hutton], when he was acting in a show I was dramaturge for, and he saw what I brought to the table.

CC: When I was an actor, earlier in my career, I was in Julius Caesar and A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Hart House. So I had a bit of a relationship with them, then Jeremy and I worked together at Shakespeare By the Sea as well, and we had a good working relationship. And I assistant-directed there last year for Robin Hood: The Musical, which is another Hart House/Shakespeare by the Sea crossover. It’s been pretty awesome working with them. As far as the management goes, they’re very supportive and trusting.

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Photo Credit: Scott Gorman. (LtoR) Lesley Robertson as Constance, Nicholas Porteous as Professor Claude Knight

RQ: What would you say your goals are this year?

CC: In life?

RQ: In life!

SB: In 2014?

RQ: In 2014!

CC: I think for me, it’s two things. On the one hand, I’m still trying to figure out what directing means and how to be good at it in a thoughtful way. I want to continue to develop because you can only learn it by doing. On the other hand, Susan and I work together separately [with Neoteny theatre] and I think we both want to make a positive and significant contribution to the theatre scene, particularly as it relates to classical-adjacent work and roles for women, so this falls right in line with that. We want to be thoughtful instead of making work for work’s sake. That’s really hard because we all want to be working all the time. When we did Overruled and Romance last year, it went really well and people wanted to know what we were doing next, but we’re trying to resist the urge to just do something for its own sake. You know, “put on a show and put my friends in it”, because that’s tempting.

RQ: Vanity project theatre.

CC: Right, and that’s such a murky area because to some degree, everything you do is a vanity project because even if you’re getting paid, you’re not getting as much as you should, so you have to be getting something else out of it. I think that sums it up nicely.

SB: Yeah! I think we’re trying to reconcile the intersection of classical work with women’s roles in general. A, let’s just say it, feminist model, to some extent.

CC: I think what we’re dancing around is that we’re interested in feminist work that’s not feminist for its own sake, but feminist for that basic definition of equal rights for all people. It’s one of those things that once you start seeing things through that lens, and you’re a creator of any kind, you have a responsibility to make sure that work continues. That being said, we’re not entirely humourless. So that, plus joy in the work. That’s the other thing with me directing is that I’m trying to find that line where everything is falling into place, but that sense of play and joy and ensemble is there too. That’s really important, as an audience member. I want to find that balance where they’re in an environment where they can live in the moment.

SB: If there’s no play in the play, then it’s entirely joyless.

RQ: It’s moral responsibility theatre, which can be pretty boring.

CC: I think about this stuff all the time because I’m kind of a cynical person and when people say things like “Oh, when this show closes, I’m going to miss this cast so much!”, I’m the one that’s like “You’re doing a job”. Navigating the line where there’s a sense of joy in the ensemble and the bond you form with the other members comes from working toward the same goal, that’s huge and important. All the other stuff, drinking together and whatever, that’s cool if you have that social vibe, but the vibe in the room is so much more exciting and important.

Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet)

By Ann-Marie MacDonald, presented by Hart House Theatre

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Where: Hart House Theatre, University of Toronto, 7 Hart House Circle
When: February 28th – March 8th, 2014 8pm, Saturday Matinee 2pm
Tickets: $15-$28 http://uofttix.ca/view.php?id=1000

For more information on the show: http://www.harthousetheatre.ca/